Hendy Hap, 152 Mead Street

Herbert A. Smith and Loretta Mead Smith, c. 1903

Hendy Hap, 1909

Hendy Hap, 1909

Directly below Hendy Hap is a massive and very long ashlar-type stone wall (bank) built for George W. Mead, Sr. under the direction of a former Civil War soldier and Ridgefield resident, Ephraim Grummond, c. 1865, and with the labor of other discharged Civil War soldiers

The stone wall behind the Chapel was constructed in about 1865 when George Mead, Sr. planned to build a house on the hill, but he was unable to get water to the top of the hill, and abandoned the project to build Tarry-A-Bit instead.

In 1903 Sarah Mead conveyed the property to her daughter Loretta.  She and her husband Herbert had just returned home from a year at the Sorbonne in Paris.  They were expecting their second son, the first having died as an infant in France.  The house style, a stone and wood Tudor, was chosen by Loretta who was eager to have a home in Waccabuc.

Herbert Smith was a graduate of Yale College and earned his PhD. at Yale in English before serving on the faculty there for two years.

His classmate and close friend, Gifford Pinchot, called him to Washington to work with him in the Forest Service after it became the Bureau of the Department of Agriculture under President Theodore Roosevelt.  Herbert served as Editor in Chief of the Journal of Forestry at a time when there was little public knowledge about forestry.

The Smith family lived in Washington DC in the winter and summers in Waccabuc.  Their three children, Theodore, Earl and Sarah, all continued living in Waccabuc with their own families.

Sarah “Sally” Frances Smith standing on the terrace, probably circa 1915. Lake Waccabuc can be seen behind her.

Sarah “Sally” Frances Smith standing on the terrace, probably circa 1915. Lake Waccabuc can be seen behind her.

front view.jpg
Earl Smith (in cap) and Martin R. Mead looking towards the lake

Earl Smith (in cap) and Martin R. Mead looking towards the lake

2013

2013

 
Hendy Hap, 2008

Hendy Hap, 2008