Tredinock, 163 Mead Street

c. 1917, Frances Studwell Mead

“The choicest property which Frances well deserved” was conveyed to her by her mother, Sarah, and she built a Tudor style country house with a magnificent view down Lake Waccabuc to the Connecticut hills.

Frances (originally named Fannie until she had her name legally changed) was the oldest of the eleven children of George and Sarah Frances Mead.  She never married but had an active social life in Brooklyn after graduating from Packer Collegiate Institute.  After her grandfather, John J. Studwell died in 1884, she lived with her grandmother at 24 Monroe Place, Brooklyn – next door to her family’s house at 26.

She taught Sunday School to a class of boys at the City Park Chapel, a branch of the First Presbyterian Church, and worked at the Union Settlement.

An enthusiastic traveler, she accompanied her mother and sister to California in the winter of 1893 to visit the Hutchinson family, “the Californian cousins.”

The following year she joined her parents, three sisters and two brothers on a “memorable trip to Alaska” via Montreal on the Canadian Pacific Railroad to Vancouver where they boarded the steamer, the S.S. Queen and visited Sitka, Juneau and Taku glacier, and saw the midnight sun.  They returned through Washington State and spent a week in Yellowstone Park “driving through the park in a carryall.”  Then it was on to Pikes Peak, Denver and Salt Lake City before returning home.

She traveled to Europe and visited friends in Maine where she contracted typhoid fever and nearly died.

She was Director of the Northern Westchester Visiting Nurse Association, chairman of the Lewisboro chapter of the American Red Cross and a founder of the York Club in New York.

The Mead Memorial Chapel was of great interest and she secured the distinguished ministers who preached there for summer vespers.

In Waccabuc her house was well staffed for summer lunches and teas on the porch, where the book group met frequently.

Frances outlived several of her younger siblings, and died in 1937 at the age of 77.

The First Presbyterian Church in Brooklyn, with a wall water fountain for the local youth.  This same water fountain made its way to the wall behind Mead Memorial Chapel.

The First Presbyterian Church in Brooklyn, with a wall water fountain for the local youth.  This same water fountain made its way to the wall behind Mead Memorial Chapel.

1914

1914

2013 entrance – it is very difficult to see the home any more due to the mature plantings and trees.  The south side of the house has a lawn that slopes down to Lake Waccabuc.

2013 entrance – it is very difficult to see the home any more due to the mature plantings and trees.  The south side of the house has a lawn that slopes down to Lake Waccabuc.