Meeko, 166 Mead Street

originally built c. 1790

Sally M. Keeler and John Newman Mead, c. 1825
Elizabeth and David Irving Mead, Sr. summered here beginning in the 1930s
Marianne and David I. Mead, Jr., 1969-82

Coralie Mead and friend

Coralie Mead and friend

The original Meeko, which means “Red Squirrel” in native American, probably dates from about 1790.  It had been the home of John Newman Mead, a distant cousin of George W. Mead, Sr. who acquired it along with several other properties between the Chapel and North Salem and gave a portion to his youngest son.

David Irving Mead, Sr., was born in Brooklyn in 1875, the ninth child of George and Sarah.  As a boy he accompanied his father to interesting events in New York and elsewhere, such as the opening of the Brooklyn Bridge, the parade for Admiral Dewey and the Columbian Exposition in Chicago.

A graduate of Yale College and Columbia Law School, he became president of the South Brooklyn Savings Bank in 1922.  He and his wife Elizabeth and four children lived in Scarsdale in winter and at Meeko in summer.

The Colonial style house, with low ceilings and wood paneling has had several additions, a beautiful rose garden with balustrades designed by the architect, Mott Schmidt, extended out from the porch.

David took a lively interest in public affairs.  He was a member of several clubs and a director of several corporations. He served as president of the Westchester Historical Society, often giving talks on local history and life in the old days of his father, George Washington Mead.  The Mead family history was kept in a written form, thanks to his interest and attentiveness.

2010

2010

2016 – photo by current owner. Note the cut-out of the squirrel in the front gate.

2016 – photo by current owner. Note the cut-out of the squirrel in the front gate.